The wedding shoes I bought off ebay arrived today. I had looked for something with a shaped heel, pointed toe and a tongue. The heal wasn’t as chunky as I would have liked, but it was hard to find something in my £5 (including postage) budget.

Second hand £5 wedding shoes off ebay

Second hand £5 wedding shoes off ebay

I knew they would not be a good colour, so I had also ordered a 12 colour sample pack of transfer dye from ColourCraft (don’t bother trying to order online, the site crashes and you have to call them to give your payment details anyway – good customer service over the phone though). I haven’t used transfer paint before, but Anne had used them on her shoes and it came out really well.

First I would need to get those lovely bows off which turn out to be held on with tough bits of wire.

Using pliers to get the bows off the shoe

Using pliers to get the bows off the shoe

Whatever decoration I used would have to cover up the glue and wire hole marks.

One bow removed, another to go

One bow removed, another to go

Transfer dye

Anne said that she ended up painting diluted dye straight on to her shoes and it seemed to work quite well. When I tried it, the fabric did seem to suck up the colour and distribute it fairly evenly. There were areas where it did not take so well, I think this was where they were slightly dirty or had glue, but it wasn’t too noticeable.  I used a swatch from the petticoat fabric to try and get the same hue.

Painting transfer dye on to the shoes

Painting transfer dye on to the shoes

The heels seemed to be a slightly different colour, so I had to put more dye on to make them look blue rather than greenish. This meant that they were quite a bit darker than the rest of the shoe. I was careful that the darker blue didn’t seep on to the main part of the shoe. I tried to make the the same colour as the dark blue petersham I will be using for the rosette decoration (you can see a sample in the picture below).

Dyed shoes with darker heels

Dyed shoes with darker heels

Now I have to wait for them to dry. I was thinking that I might use a really hot hairdryer to try and stabilize the colour. Normally you would paint the transfer dye on to paper and then use an iron to press the design on to fabric.

I painted a test piece of fabric to see if water would affect the dye on the shoes after it had dried. The colour didn’t shift when I sprayed it with water, so I didn’t bother heating the shoes with the hair dryer. I figured it would be wet at the Wallace Collection anyway.