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Studying Theatrical Costume and other adventures in London - sewing, fabrics and events.

Tag: bias binding

Homework 32: Making up the cuffs

Using the piece I cut in class 32, I sewed a 8mm bias channel about 30mm from the selvage edge. This was to put in elastic so the edge would be ruffled. I then gathered along the curved edge so that it would provide the baggy shape with a straight edge at the bottom of the cuff.

Cutting the cuff in lawn

Cutting the cuff in lawn

The cuff had to fit in to the bodice sleeve, so gathering had to fit on a bias strip 36cm long.

Bias binding the top of the cuff

Bias binding the top of the cuff

The elastic channel looked really bulky and not very good.

Using bias for the elastic channel

Using bias for the elastic channel - very ugly

Because it looked so hideous, on the other cuff, I just put a pleat in the fabric and threaded the elastic through that. The elastic I was using was flat and only 4mm wide.

Using a pleat in the cuff to hold the elastic

Using a pleat in the cuff to hold the elastic

This looked a lot better, so I unpicked the other cuff and did it the same way. All of this had to be hand sewn as it is very visible and machine stitching would not be correct for this period.

Once I was happy with the cuffs, I just slip stitched them to the facing inside the sleeve.

Homework 31: Quilted petticoat – pocket slits and waistband

Pocket slits

I had been putting this off for a while. I have to admit I was very nervous to be cutting in to the petticoat which had taken hours to quilt. Eva’s petticoat had slits in too, so I had a good chance to inspect and see what she had done.

I planned it all very carefully, working out how long the slits would need to be so that they would clear the bumpads and give you enough room to get your hand comfortably in and out. I had pleated the petticoat with the intention that the slits would be partially hidden in one of the folds on each side.

The pleated petticoat was only tacked on the petersham.  While the petticoat was on the stand (over the bum pads and underpetticoat) I undid a few tacks, pinnning securley so the pleats would not slip. This was to give me access to mark the slit line. I wanted the slit line to fall down the centre of one of the ovals, so I marked a dotted line from the waist to the end point using a soluble marker.

Blue dots mark where the pocket slits will go

Side of petticoat - the blue dots mark where to cut the pocket slit

I cut through the waistband following the dotted line while the petticoat was still on the stand, but this became awkward, so I decided to take it off to cut on a table.

Starting to cut the pocket slits

Starting to cut the pocket slits

I had visions of the whole quilt unravelling, so I had stay stitched down either side of the line, just in case.

About to cut through the quilted oval

Stay stitching down each side of the cut. About to cut through the quilted oval.

Phew, it was all ok, but I thought I should get on with the bias binding asap. I used one complete length, pinned in place and just bent around the bottom and back up.

Bias pinned in place round the bottom corner.

Bias pinned in place round the bottom corner.

I just turned over and slip stitched on the other side. Next time, I think I will apply the binding to the outside first and slip stitch on the inside.

Finishing the bias binding for the pocket slits

Finishing the bias binding for the pocket slits

Finished pocket slit

Finished pocket slit

Waistband

By cutting the waistband when making the pocket slits, I had divided it into two pieces, a back and front. I had to extend the petersham on the front piece as it needed to be longer so it could overlap the back.

I used the same fabric as the rest of the petticoat and cut two 14cm deep strips just longer than the front and back measurements. Folded them in half and then pinned in place ready to hand sew.

Waistband covering pinned in place to go over the petersham

Waistband covering pinned in place to go over the petersham

I hand stitched going through all layers to make sure it would be secure. Trimmed the excess and slip stitched the other side. I did not close the sides, just turned in,  so I would have a channel for the tapes to be threaded through.

Back of petticoat. You can see the tapes used to tie the petticoat and the pocket slits at the side.

Back of petticoat. You can see the tapes used to tie the petticoat and the pocket slits at the side.

To put on the petticoat, you would have to  do up the tapes for the back first, and then bring up the front panel and tie the tapes overlapping at the back. Theatrically, this might not be the ideal fastening if you have to get in for a quick change, and the tapes could come undone easily, but I do prefer the look if this was to be seen.

Side of petticoat - you can see the front panel overlapping the back

Side of petticoat - you can see the front panel overlapping the back

Homework 29: Quilted petticoat – binding the hem

Yeay for another sewing intensive bank holiday weekend. Today I will apply to the hem the bias binding I made yesterday.

As I have grown sew attached to hand sewing since starting the quilt, I think it would be sacrilege at this point to let my lovely quilt go anywhere near a machine, so on with the hand sewing.

Cutting off excess seam allowance using pinking sheers

Cutting off excess seam allowance using pinking sheers

The bias strips I had cut had several joins as the piece of fabric I had used was only so wide. I wanted to make sure that the joins would not be too noticeable and were placed symmetrically on the petticoat. I took this in to account when pinning the bias in place before sewing.

Centre mark on the bias binding is lined up with the centre front of the petticoat

Centre mark on the bias binding is lined up with the centre front of the petticoat

Here you can see the bias joins, just before the left quarter line. The other join is in the same place on the other side.

Here you can see the bias joins, just before the left quarter line. The other join is in the same place on the other side.

Hand sewing on the bias along the fold line

Hand sewing on the bias along the fold line

Where the bias is meeting at centre back. I trimmed the excess to avoid bulk when folding over.

Where the bias is meeting at centre back. I trimmed the excess to avoid bulk when folding over.

Binding at the centre back. I didn't want to join it at an angle like at the sides  because of the centre back seam of the petticoat

Binding at the centre back. I didn't want to join it at an angle like at the sides because of the centre back seam of the petticoat

Folding over the binding - Almost done!

Folding over the binding - Almost done!

See tomorrows post for pictures of the binding and quilting finished.

Homework 29: Quilted Petticoat – making bias strips

I had bought some velvet bias binding off ebay, but when it turned up it was the cheap looking polyester type and wasn’t quite the right shade of blue, so I thought as I was running out of time I better make some in the same as the cotton petticoat top fabric.

I got out everything I needed:

  • pattermaster
  • quilting pencil
  • pins
  • scissors
  • fabric
  • 25mm bias maker
  • iron and ironing board
Some of the tools I used to make the bias binding

Some of the tools I used to make the bias binding

Fabric folded at 45 degrees to the grain, ready to mark out

Fabric folded at 45 degrees to the grain, ready to mark out

A few bias strips marked out. Pins are used to make cutting easier.

A few bias strips marked out. Pins are used to make cutting easier.

The strips cut out, still with pins holding the 2 layers together

The strips cut out, still with pins holding the 2 layers together

Stringing the strips together

Stringing the strips together

Two strips sewn together

Two strips sewn together

Using the 25 mm bias maker. I pin the strip to the ironing board to stop it from slipping.

Using the 25 mm bias maker. I pin the strip to the ironing board to stop it from slipping.

pressing the strips to make binding

Pressing the strips to make binding

I knew I had to make enough to go round 240cm circumference of the hem and to bind the 2 x 30cm pocket slits. It didn’t take too long to knock up the 3 meters. Tomorrow on with the binding (by hand).

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