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Tag: draping on the stand

Homework 31: Quilted petticoat – pocket slits and waistband

Pocket slits

I had been putting this off for a while. I have to admit I was very nervous to be cutting in to the petticoat which had taken hours to quilt. Eva’s petticoat had slits in too, so I had a good chance to inspect and see what she had done.

I planned it all very carefully, working out how long the slits would need to be so that they would clear the bumpads and give you enough room to get your hand comfortably in and out. I had pleated the petticoat with the intention that the slits would be partially hidden in one of the folds on each side.

The pleated petticoat was only tacked on the petersham.  While the petticoat was on the stand (over the bum pads and underpetticoat) I undid a few tacks, pinnning securley so the pleats would not slip. This was to give me access to mark the slit line. I wanted the slit line to fall down the centre of one of the ovals, so I marked a dotted line from the waist to the end point using a soluble marker.

Blue dots mark where the pocket slits will go

Side of petticoat - the blue dots mark where to cut the pocket slit

I cut through the waistband following the dotted line while the petticoat was still on the stand, but this became awkward, so I decided to take it off to cut on a table.

Starting to cut the pocket slits

Starting to cut the pocket slits

I had visions of the whole quilt unravelling, so I had stay stitched down either side of the line, just in case.

About to cut through the quilted oval

Stay stitching down each side of the cut. About to cut through the quilted oval.

Phew, it was all ok, but I thought I should get on with the bias binding asap. I used one complete length, pinned in place and just bent around the bottom and back up.

Bias pinned in place round the bottom corner.

Bias pinned in place round the bottom corner.

I just turned over and slip stitched on the other side. Next time, I think I will apply the binding to the outside first and slip stitch on the inside.

Finishing the bias binding for the pocket slits

Finishing the bias binding for the pocket slits

Finished pocket slit

Finished pocket slit

Waistband

By cutting the waistband when making the pocket slits, I had divided it into two pieces, a back and front. I had to extend the petersham on the front piece as it needed to be longer so it could overlap the back.

I used the same fabric as the rest of the petticoat and cut two 14cm deep strips just longer than the front and back measurements. Folded them in half and then pinned in place ready to hand sew.

Waistband covering pinned in place to go over the petersham

Waistband covering pinned in place to go over the petersham

I hand stitched going through all layers to make sure it would be secure. Trimmed the excess and slip stitched the other side. I did not close the sides, just turned in,  so I would have a channel for the tapes to be threaded through.

Back of petticoat. You can see the tapes used to tie the petticoat and the pocket slits at the side.

Back of petticoat. You can see the tapes used to tie the petticoat and the pocket slits at the side.

To put on the petticoat, you would have to  do up the tapes for the back first, and then bring up the front panel and tie the tapes overlapping at the back. Theatrically, this might not be the ideal fastening if you have to get in for a quick change, and the tapes could come undone easily, but I do prefer the look if this was to be seen.

Side of petticoat - you can see the front panel overlapping the back

Side of petticoat - you can see the front panel overlapping the back

Homework 31: Shaping and finishing the sleeves

I used the shaping I had done on the calico sleeve as a guide, but tried moving the pleats from the top so that they were round closer to the body. The shape definitely looks better when the arm is curved towards the body.

Shaping the sleeves. The right side pleats are further round to the top than the left side.q

Shaping the sleeves. The right side pleats are further round to the top than the left side.

When it was all pinned in place, I fitted the bodice to check that the elbow or lower arm would not pull or get caught when flexing. It all seemed to work well.

Once I was happy with the shape I had sewed the pleats and cuff folds in place and then finished the facing.

Class 29: Period bodice fitting

I had sewn up the the bodice pieces over the weekend so was able to do a fitting  when I got in to class.

First fitting on bodice

First fitting of period bodice

I shouldn’t have had my top on underneath, but it was a very warm morning and I didn’t want to perspire all over my corset.

You could see from the fitting that the lines were fairly good, but there some noticeable problems which need to be addressed:

  • the centre front lines did not meet by 20mm on each side
  • the neckline was much lower than intended
centre line markings are out by 20mm on each side

Centre line markings are out by 20mm on each side

I could have just used the extra seam allowance on the stomacher to correct the width problem, but that would have made the stomacher look wide. Instead, I had to undo the side seams and use the seam allowance there.  10mm on each side (left and right) to add 20mm to the overall measurement.

Letting out the side seam - yellow basting shows the original line, blue dots show the new line.

Letting out the side seam - yellow basting shows the original line, blue dots show the new line.

I rebasted this seam before machine stitching as one side was very curved and I was worried it would slip under the machine foot.

Basting the let out the side seam before machine stitching

Basting the let out the side seam before machine stitching

There was enough seam allowance on the neckline so that I wouldn’t have to redo the stomacher.

Time for a second fitting – the centre front lines now met up, but the shoulders had to be reset.

Shoulder seams let out

Shoulder seams let out

By the end of the day, we got it so the bodice sat right and did some draping on the stand.

Unfinished garments on the stand

Unfinished garments on the stand with overskirt quickly hitched up

Class 23: Draping the quilted petticoat and top fabric to check yardages

Draping the quilted petticoat and top fabric

I couldn’t wait to drape it on the stand to see what it would look like. The tree design came up a lot higher than I was expecting. The stand would not go down as low as my waistline, so in the photos she is sitting a few inches taller than me. The petticoat appears longer as I have left a good 75mm seam allowance at the hem, although I am planning to put three lines of stitching on the hem 1cm apart, and the bias binding needs to be added.

Draping the quilted petticoat on the stand

Draping the quilted petticoat on the stand

I also draped the top fabric over the petticoat to check the fabric yardage and formula Claire and I previously worked out was still correct to get the period shape.

Top fabric draped over the quilted petticoat

Top fabric draped over the quilted petticoat

Pleating and gathering

While the petticoat was on the stand, I practised my pleating and gathering.

Pleating at the back

Pleating at the back

Gathering on the stand

Gathering on the stand

Replacing eyelets

One of my eyelets had come off a little while ago, and a few others looked loose, so I used my prym eyelet tool at home to push them together. Unfortunately, I didn’t have the right sized attachment for the 5mm eyelets, but I thought it would be close enough. It wasn’t and so a few of my eyelets were deformed before I realised what was happening as it only disfigured them on the side I couldn’t see.

Deformed and replaced eyelets

Deformed and replaced eyelets. You can see one deformed eyelet I can't get out.

Eyeleting tools: hole punch and pliers - I wish I had a grommet/eyelet machine

Eyeleting tools: hole punch and pliers - I wish I had a grommet/eyelet machine

Class 18: Working out overskirt yardages

Today Claire got us to work out yardages for the overskirt, gave us some instructions for the quilted petticoat, and I helped to fit Ann’s bodice.

In a bind – corset splitting

I wanted to double check the fitting of the period bodice from last week, but disaster struck when one of my over enthusiastic class mates pulled my corset laces too tightly and one of the seams on the unbound side split at the back. This is one of the seams I so carefully lined up and sink stitched in step J of making an 18th century corset.

My poor split corset

My poor split corset

Claire said I should get some button hole thread (very strong), and starting from the top of the tear, bind the seam back together. Will let you know how I get on.

Overskirt draping and working out yardages

Claire said that we needed to drape the overskirt fabric to see how it would hang, then we would be able to work out how much we would need and a layplan.

Unfortunately, I only had a couple of meters of my top fabric, so I was only able to do a quarter of the waist.

Draping overskirt fabric over petticoat to work out yardages

Draping overskirt fabric over petticoat to work out yardages

Draping overskirt fabric over bumpads and petticoat

Draping overskirt fabric over bumpads and petticoat

I originally worked out that I would need about 7 meters of fabric for the overskirt, but after speaking with Claire, revised this to 3 drops (150cm wide), so would probably need only 4.5 meters. Additional material would be required for the bodice and sleeves to match.

Class 10: Petticoat construction – waistbands and pleating/gathering on the stand

Finding the waist

  1. Set up the stand (dummy) You can either set up the stand so the the waistline is at the correct height, or shorter so the distance between the floor and the waistline is the actual intended length of the skirt i.e. the hem sits on the ground. The second method makes it easier for you to get the hemline level all round with out having to use a ruler.
  2. Arrange the petticoat Once you have the right height, put the petticoat on the stand and level it out. Arrange the fabric of the petticoat roughly how you want it to end up, especially paying attention to the amount of fabric at the front sides and back, as more fabric will be required at the sides to go over the bum pads, and you may wish to have less fullness at the front of the skirt. Gather at front and pleat at the back. Too many gathers at the front will make it fall in.
  3. Mark the waistline When you are happy with the draping, use a water soluble marker (normally blue) draw around the waistline. The blue line goes at the bottom of the petersham waistband which should sit on the actual waist.
  4. Take the petticoat off the stand and lay flat. As the fabric was gathered when you drew the waistline, the blue line will now appear as dots or dashes. Connect the dots on one side, and then copy to other side and ensure they are even. You will see the line going up over where the bum pads would be and lower at the front an back where it is flatter.
  5. Add 7.5 cam seam allowance at the top and cut off the excess fabric. Keep cut off as this can be used again as a template for these bumpads.

Applying the petticoat waistband

Using a Petersham strip for the waistband, take the waist measurement and add 1.25cm for ease, and another 7.5 cm at each end for fitting (better to be too long than too short). Mark cf and quarters.

Pin on bum pads and petticoat drops to stand.

Starting at the back, pin the right hand side of the placket opening to the CB mark on the petersham waistband.

Using double thread tack top and bottom of pleats on to petersham. This allows you the machine stitch from the petersham side without the pleats folding back.

See my petersham waistband sample for more detailed instructions (with pictures).

Tips for pleating/gathering on the stand

  • Do one side and then the other (pleats normally face towards the back)
  • Gather front and then let out to ease. Gathers might be good between pleats and front
  • You can use your fingers to measure the depth of a pleat and check that they are even
  • You can often see at the bottom of pleat or drapes if they are out or uneven
  • Chevron pleat – front first, last to back
  • Edge of deep pleats face centre back
  • Yokes may be used for bigger petticoats

Homework:

  • practice pleating/gathering petticoat waistband on the stand.

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