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Tag: placket

Homework 32: Period bodice – placket

I measured the front of the bodice between the top and bottom piping to get the length of the placket. I wanted it to be about 50mm wide. I would be using the drill covered by top fabric.

I cut double width layer of the top fabric 2omm longer than the placket length to give a 10mm seam allowance. One length was a selvage edge, so I wouldn’t have to neaten the edge to stop it from fraying. I made a pocket with the top fabric to slide in the drill layer, which cut was slightly smaller than the placket measurements. I trimmed the edge that would be caught in the seam with pinking shears.

Placket made from top fabric with drill inside

Placket made from top fabric with drill inside

Underside of placket

Pinked edge


Placket placed ready to be sewn

Placket placed ready to be sewn

I slipped stitched on the fold and along the selvage edge to hold the placket in place. I then stitched the top and bottom edges in place so that there was less chance of the placket getting ruffled up and out of place.

Placket showing on the outside of an open bodice

Placket showing on the outside of an open bodice

Placket on the inside of the open bodice

Placket on the inside of the open bodice


Haha! now no one will be able to see my red and white corset. Hmm.

Class 31: Period bodice – fitting and finishing

When I got in to class I got on my costume to fit the bodice and work out what what left to do.

Fitting the bodice. You can clearly see it needs a placket.

Fitting the bodice. You can clearly see it needs a placket.

There were a number of things I needed to fix/amend/do:

  1. piping – sort out the ends at centre front so they can be tightened (next time use smaller gauge piping, preferably cotton as it has better grip)
  2. hook and eye fastenings
    • stab stitch through to better hold in place
    • stitch around so that none of the metal on the hoops show
  3. still to do:
    • front placket/modesty panel
    • softener around neckline
    • cuffs – made to look like it is the chemise showing through

Ends of the piping

When I was applying the piping I couldn’t quite remember how Claire had asked us to do it, so I had finished it like this:

Opps! Piping finished the wrong way

Opps! Piping finished the wrong way

Opps! Folded back incorrectly

Opps! Folded back incorrectly

What I should have done is unpick the last bit of piping and turned it in so that the cord would be free to hang out and be tightened.

The correct way to end the piping

The correct way to end the piping

To correct it I had to:

  1. unpick the top and bottom hooks and eyes, and some of the piping
  2. turn back the piping end
  3. reslip stitch the piping
  4. put back the hooks and eyes

It seamed to take ages when it felt like I had so much left to do.

Fichu

I spoke with Claire about the fichus and we looked in some of the books in class. Some fichus are much larger than others, but as mine would be tucked in to my dress, only a small one would be necessary.

Fichu pattern from 'Period costume for stage and screen'

Fichu pattern from 'Period costume for stage and screen'

Neckerchief pattern form 'Evolution of fashion'

Neckerchief pattern from 'Evolution of fashion'

Next week we will be working on:

  • hems and draping
  • using button hole elastic to join the skirt and bodice

Class 6: Petticoat – Finding the waist and inserting the placket.

You can put in the placket only once the waistline has been established on the petticoat to ensure that the depth of the opening stays the same.

Draping on the stand to find the waist

  1. Waistline is established by using measurements to set up the stand accordingly and then draping the petticoat on the stand over the bum pads.
  2. Using cotton tape around the waist to hold up the petticoat, arrange the fabric to give the desired length and shape.To manage the fabric, often pleats or gathers are used to manage the bulk of material at the top. Usually there will be more pleats or gathers at the side and back than at the front, as this will be more flattering the the wearer.You do not want to have the front completely flat as this may cause the petticoat to ‘cave’ inwards at the front.
  3. Once you are happy with the arrangement and the length of the petticoat, use soluble marker to draw a like or points round the waistline.
  4. Removing the petticoat from the stand and laying flat folded in half (CF to CB), you can see the marker with gaps (where the fabric was folded).
  5. To make the waistline you just follow the point and join them up making sure that the line is similar on both sides and meets at the cb and cf.
Pin bum pads to the stand

Pin bum pads to the stand

Petticoat arranged on the stand

Arrange the petticoat on the stand

Marking the waistline with soluable pen

Marking the waistline with soluable pen

Joining up the dots to mark the waistline

Joining up the dots to mark the waistline

Inserting the placket

  1. The placket should measure 30cm x 2.5cm when finished.
    To achieve this you will need a 63cm x 9 cm strip of fabric as a ‘facing’ is required. (2 x length of placket + seam allowance / 2 x 30cm + 3cm = 63cm).
  2. Measure down 30cm from the waistline. Sew from the hem to this point (or open th seam from the waist down to the point).
  3. Press the seam allowances flat on the petticoat closure at cb before inserting the placket.
  4. Press both long sides of the placket facing to wrong side of fabric by 1.5cm so that both sides are reinforced and the centre is flexible enough to fold over application edges.
  5. At the bottom of the cb closure point, snip the seam allowances so that they can lie flat.
  6. With right sides together, ‘straighten out’ closure at cb so it becomes a straight line and lay the placket along the right hand side of the opening, attaching the facing with a 1.5cm seam allowance and continuing to the top edge of the left hand side of opening.
  7. Press seam allowance towards facing
  8. Fold the placket over to encase the raw edge. If there is any excess, this should be hidden on the inside.
  9. Edge or sink stitch to neaten.
  10. At the bottom of the placket, stitch a diagonal line from the fold up to approx 2 cm at the edge. This will help the placket to lay flat.

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