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Tag: quilted petticoat (page 1 of 2)

Homework 31: Quilted petticoat – pocket slits and waistband

Pocket slits

I had been putting this off for a while. I have to admit I was very nervous to be cutting in to the petticoat which had taken hours to quilt. Eva’s petticoat had slits in too, so I had a good chance to inspect and see what she had done.

I planned it all very carefully, working out how long the slits would need to be so that they would clear the bumpads and give you enough room to get your hand comfortably in and out. I had pleated the petticoat with the intention that the slits would be partially hidden in one of the folds on each side.

The pleated petticoat was only tacked on the petersham.  While the petticoat was on the stand (over the bum pads and underpetticoat) I undid a few tacks, pinnning securley so the pleats would not slip. This was to give me access to mark the slit line. I wanted the slit line to fall down the centre of one of the ovals, so I marked a dotted line from the waist to the end point using a soluble marker.

Blue dots mark where the pocket slits will go

Side of petticoat - the blue dots mark where to cut the pocket slit

I cut through the waistband following the dotted line while the petticoat was still on the stand, but this became awkward, so I decided to take it off to cut on a table.

Starting to cut the pocket slits

Starting to cut the pocket slits

I had visions of the whole quilt unravelling, so I had stay stitched down either side of the line, just in case.

About to cut through the quilted oval

Stay stitching down each side of the cut. About to cut through the quilted oval.

Phew, it was all ok, but I thought I should get on with the bias binding asap. I used one complete length, pinned in place and just bent around the bottom and back up.

Bias pinned in place round the bottom corner.

Bias pinned in place round the bottom corner.

I just turned over and slip stitched on the other side. Next time, I think I will apply the binding to the outside first and slip stitch on the inside.

Finishing the bias binding for the pocket slits

Finishing the bias binding for the pocket slits

Finished pocket slit

Finished pocket slit

Waistband

By cutting the waistband when making the pocket slits, I had divided it into two pieces, a back and front. I had to extend the petersham on the front piece as it needed to be longer so it could overlap the back.

I used the same fabric as the rest of the petticoat and cut two 14cm deep strips just longer than the front and back measurements. Folded them in half and then pinned in place ready to hand sew.

Waistband covering pinned in place to go over the petersham

Waistband covering pinned in place to go over the petersham

I hand stitched going through all layers to make sure it would be secure. Trimmed the excess and slip stitched the other side. I did not close the sides, just turned in,  so I would have a channel for the tapes to be threaded through.

Back of petticoat. You can see the tapes used to tie the petticoat and the pocket slits at the side.

Back of petticoat. You can see the tapes used to tie the petticoat and the pocket slits at the side.

To put on the petticoat, you would have to  do up the tapes for the back first, and then bring up the front panel and tie the tapes overlapping at the back. Theatrically, this might not be the ideal fastening if you have to get in for a quick change, and the tapes could come undone easily, but I do prefer the look if this was to be seen.

Side of petticoat - you can see the front panel overlapping the back

Side of petticoat - you can see the front panel overlapping the back

Homework 29: Quilted petticoat – pleating on to waistband

Now the bottom of the quilted petticoat is finished, I have to concentrate on the top. First thing to do is to get rid of any excess wadding above the quilting line. The quilting on the petticoat only touches the waistband at the front, around the side and the back, the quilting doesn’t start until it drops off the roll of the bumpad.

Once all the excess has been removed, I double checked the waistline markings and the laid the quilt out flat on the table. It was folded in half with the centre front and centre back on the crease. After that, I carefully added seam allowance and marked parallel to waistline. Next thing to do was carefully cut.

Excess seam allowance cut parallel to waistline

Excess seam allowance cut parallel to waistline - you can see the hump for the bumpads.

Pleating on to waistband

It would  have been easier to gather, especially as the waist would not bee seen much, but I had read a lot about petticoats of the period would have most likely been pleated, so I wanted to do that. I also thought it would look better with the pocket slits.

Trying to remember the pleating tips Claire had told us earlier in the year, I ended up pleating  and repleating 10 or more times as I didn’t want them too big or too small. I also had a tendency to leave the petticoat too flat at the front so that it looked like a big upside down U.

Pleating on to waistband, but with too much fabric at the back, so the front looks too flat.

Pleating on to waistband, but with too much fabric at the back, so the front looks too flat.

I realised if I had more fabric at the front, the fabric would fall in more of the period shape.

Pleats too wide

Pleats too wide

I wanted the pleats to look even, but I also wanted the quilted ovals to match and line up in places and this drew me to make larger or smaller pleats than what was required.

Back of the petticoat - showing the oval meeting up on the pleat folds

Back of the petticoat - showing the oval meeting up on the pleat folds

Once I was happy with it, I tacked it on to the waistband ready for fitting.

Quilting on the quilted petticoat finished!

Gosh, that took a fair amount of time. Now I only have to sort out the waistband and pocket slits. Anyway here are a couple of pictures of the front and back before I pleat it on to the petersham.

Front of quilted petticoat

Front of quilted petticoat

Back of quilted petticoat

Back of quilted petticoat

I was so proud, I added to the Quilt of Quilts on the V&A website:

V&A

Quilt of Quilts

Reproduction 18th century quilted petticoat

Reproduction 18th century quilted petticoat

View this quilt on the V&A website

http://www.vam.ac.uk/quiltofquilts

Homework 29: Quilted petticoat – binding the hem

Yeay for another sewing intensive bank holiday weekend. Today I will apply to the hem the bias binding I made yesterday.

As I have grown sew attached to hand sewing since starting the quilt, I think it would be sacrilege at this point to let my lovely quilt go anywhere near a machine, so on with the hand sewing.

Cutting off excess seam allowance using pinking sheers

Cutting off excess seam allowance using pinking sheers

The bias strips I had cut had several joins as the piece of fabric I had used was only so wide. I wanted to make sure that the joins would not be too noticeable and were placed symmetrically on the petticoat. I took this in to account when pinning the bias in place before sewing.

Centre mark on the bias binding is lined up with the centre front of the petticoat

Centre mark on the bias binding is lined up with the centre front of the petticoat

Here you can see the bias joins, just before the left quarter line. The other join is in the same place on the other side.

Here you can see the bias joins, just before the left quarter line. The other join is in the same place on the other side.

Hand sewing on the bias along the fold line

Hand sewing on the bias along the fold line

Where the bias is meeting at centre back. I trimmed the excess to avoid bulk when folding over.

Where the bias is meeting at centre back. I trimmed the excess to avoid bulk when folding over.

Binding at the centre back. I didn't want to join it at an angle like at the sides  because of the centre back seam of the petticoat

Binding at the centre back. I didn't want to join it at an angle like at the sides because of the centre back seam of the petticoat

Folding over the binding - Almost done!

Folding over the binding - Almost done!

See tomorrows post for pictures of the binding and quilting finished.

Homework 29: Quilted Petticoat – making bias strips

I had bought some velvet bias binding off ebay, but when it turned up it was the cheap looking polyester type and wasn’t quite the right shade of blue, so I thought as I was running out of time I better make some in the same as the cotton petticoat top fabric.

I got out everything I needed:

  • pattermaster
  • quilting pencil
  • pins
  • scissors
  • fabric
  • 25mm bias maker
  • iron and ironing board
Some of the tools I used to make the bias binding

Some of the tools I used to make the bias binding

Fabric folded at 45 degrees to the grain, ready to mark out

Fabric folded at 45 degrees to the grain, ready to mark out

A few bias strips marked out. Pins are used to make cutting easier.

A few bias strips marked out. Pins are used to make cutting easier.

The strips cut out, still with pins holding the 2 layers together

The strips cut out, still with pins holding the 2 layers together

Stringing the strips together

Stringing the strips together

Two strips sewn together

Two strips sewn together

Using the 25 mm bias maker. I pin the strip to the ironing board to stop it from slipping.

Using the 25 mm bias maker. I pin the strip to the ironing board to stop it from slipping.

pressing the strips to make binding

Pressing the strips to make binding

I knew I had to make enough to go round 240cm circumference of the hem and to bind the 2 x 30cm pocket slits. It didn’t take too long to knock up the 3 meters. Tomorrow on with the binding (by hand).

Class 27: Period bodice construction

Today we were going to start construction of the period bodice. We were meant to have finished our petticoats, but I still had quite a bit to do.

In the morning, I had a fitting so that Claire could see how far I had got. I still hadn’t quite finished the ovals, a few missing at the top centre back, but these would be covered by the overskirt. More importantly, I had not got the petticoat on to a waistband yet or sewn the bias binding round the hem.

Fitting the quilted petticoat

Fitting the quilted petticoat. You can see the excess wadding needs to be removed at waistline

Clare said that I should just make a centre back placket opening at the back, which would be simpler and correct for ‘theatrical costume’ to allow the actress to easily get in and out of it, but I ☆.•really•.☆ want to finish the petticoat by hand  - 90+ hours so far hand stitching,  what is another few hours? I also would really like to use ties and have pocket slits. I always have to much bumph on me I need pockets.

Still to do on petticoat:

  • take out excess wadding round waistline
  • sew on to petersham
  • add pocket slits and bias bind
  • finish waistband
  • add hook and bar fastenings at front
  • bias bind the hem

Period bodice construction

In the afternoon we started on the bodice construction. Clare had given us a boned bodice overview at the end of last term, partly to explain what materials we would need to get during the holidays:

  • cotton drill – 1m
  • cotton lawn – 1m
  • domette – 1m
  • top fabric – 1m (more if matching pattern lines)
  • steel boning 8mm – 10mm (no rigiline)

The main aim today were:

  • to understand the construction of the bodicebo
  • adding boning positions
  • adding seam allowances
  • cutting out and marking up lawn layer
  • machine basting lawn to drill

Boning

We will be using  flat steels (not rigiline) for the bodice boning, even though the corset will be providing a good foundation to the shape.

The steels tend to placed in the centre of each panel, usually sloping towards the centre front or back, along straight seams, and either side of centre front and centre back. For more support,  such as on the side front panel, 2 bones can be placed next to each other. If boning is required down a seam,  channel tape can be used. If the seam is curved used spiral sprung boning.

The boning on the back only goes as high as the shoulder blade, except on a laced back opening where the bone go all the way to the top on the opening. At the sides, the bones tend to stop at the breastline, but at the front they are full length as the stomacher tends to stop quite low.

Period bodice pattern pieces with bone placement

Period bodice pattern pieces with bone placement and standard seam allowances (before changing them depending on the openings/design)

The bones on the stomacher in 18th century styles tend to fan out being wider at the top than at the bottom, rather than being straight which was characteristic in Tudor stomachers. Even though my stomacher was not very wide, I used 4 bones on each side.   If there is no CF opening, place two bones straight down the center front. If there is an opening, place a bone down each side leaving space for fastenings.

You can add channels down the seam allowance, just in case the bodice is too tight.

Seam Allowances

Generally before for the first fitting it is good to leave at least 25mm seam allowance, but more in some cases:

  • CF opening – add at least 50mm
  • CB opening –  add 100mm if it is to be turned back and eyeleted
  • CB/CF without opening – 50mm unless cut on the fold
  • front side opening/stomacher – add 50mm on each side
  • top/bottom – 25mm, more at neckline if you think it might need adjusting.
  • side back – 25mm, or more if very curved.
  • shoulders – 40mm

Starting the construction

Once the pattern was all drawn out, I started on the construction.

  1. Press lawn
  2. Cut out lawn and drill
  3. mark out with bone placement
  4. machine mount drill on to lawn (drill – good side faces the body)
  5. machine sew  bone channels (all the way down to bottom edge in to the seam allowance)

The drill and lawn should be mounted ready for next week.

Homework

  • Bodice: mount drill and lawn layers and sew boning channels
  • Overskirt: gather on to waistband
  • Quilted petticoat: remove bulk wadding at top, pleat on to waistband, add placket, biasbind the bottom, finish quilting, add pockets.

Homework 26: Quilted petticoat – marking out the ovals

This week I started on the overlapping ovals that will fill the top area of the quilted petticoat. The design is similar to the quilting pattern called ‘The 7 treasures of Buddha‘ where circles are used instead of ovals, but I am sure it wasn’t referred to as that in the 18h century.

Planning

I wanted to make sure that the there would be complete ovals all the way round, so I would not have any that were skinny/fat/incomplete and so the pattern would look even all around.

  1. measure the circumference of the petticoat
  2. work out roughly how big the ovals should be
  3. divide the circumference of the petticoat by the width of the ovals,  adjusting slightly to take up any excess
  4. make a template oval using card (fished out from the recycling box), putting a cross marking the centre/top/bottom/left/right points
  5. draw out on pattern paper and measure to check calculations are correct. Use the cross marking on the template to line up and position correctly to draw one oval to the next.

I am glad I drew out the pattern on paper first. The ovals I ended up with were about 2/3rds smaller the size of the ones I originally thought would be a good size. This obviously means more stitching, but  I think it will look better in the long run.

Transferring the pattern

Instead of using the transfer mesh and chacopel pencil to mark the ovals, I used the card template and a silver quilting pencil along with my pattern master to make sure everything was level.

Marking out the ovals using patternmaster, card template and silver quilters pencil

Marking out the ovals using patternmaster, card template and silver quilters pencil

I started at the centre front above the front panel pattern. In the image above, the quilt is laid out on the table upside down (with the waistline of the quilt closest to me and the hem furthest away). The pattern master is (almost) following the centre front line and I have used the horizontal guideline on the card template to make it level. In the image below you can get a closer look.

First oval drawn over CF line. Template positioned ready to draw the next oval.

First oval drawn over CF line. Template positioned ready to draw the next oval.

I ended using a long ruler to make points to mark the line where the centre of each oval should line up along the circumference of the petticoat. I wanted to make sure this horizontal line would meet up at the centre back before I marked out all the ovals. I knew I would end up following the wrong line if I had to redo the guide marks. The silver pencil is quite faint on this colour fabric, but this is good as I don’t want it to show later.

You can see 3 rows with the ovals overlapping to make the pattern

You can see 3 rows with the ovals overlapping to make the pattern

Having the cross on the template made it a lot easier to line up the template. Each time I drew an oval I would mark the top/bottom/left/right quarter points and use these to place the next, making sure I was also following the horizontal circumference guide points.

Close up showing ovals overlapping and how the cross on the card template helps to position the oval squarely shape

Close up showing ovals overlapping and how the cross on the card template helps to position the oval squarely shape

At the top of the centre back of the petticoat had not been sewn up to allow access to get in for fittings, so I pinned this up carefully, but didn’t draw the centre back ovals. I could see that it would match up, but I will quilt the rest, sew up the seam and then sort this bit out.

Centre back of the petticoat.

Centre back of the petticoat.

Right, with most of that marked out – only 70 ovals to sew!

Class 26: Quilted petticoat – bottom border continued

Not too much to report today, just plodding along with the bottom border of the quilted petticoat. I am just finishing the back where the pattern joins, so it has been a little tricky to make sure the pattern meets and still looks good.

Just to remind myself of the goal it should look something like this:

Silk quilted 18th century petticoat - Musum of fine art Boston

Silk quilted 18th century petticoat - Musum of fine art Boston

The main differences between the petticoat above are that: the one above has a silk top fabric, mine is cotton; and I have a large tree design on the front.

The centre back seam will look more similar to the above image as where the bottom border meets at the back the vines meet at a short ‘trunk’ section.  You can just make this out in the picture below (although it is not too clear as there is a slight crease).

Bottom border 'Trunk' at centre back of quilted petticoat

Bottom border 'Trunk' at centre back of quilted petticoat

Next class (after bank holiday):

  • Starting on bodice, so we need to bring domette/lawn/drill/top fabric
  • Quilted petticoat should be finished (hmm – I still have a lot to do)

Class 25: Quilted petticoat – bottom border

Over the Easter holiday I managed to get most of the border finished, but spent this class still working on it.

The border design is mirrored at the sides, but at the front and the back I didn’t want it to be symmetrical so I had to spend some time drawing out the design to make sure all the motifs would fit and be well placed.

I really don’t know how I would have transferred the design without the transfer mesh. It is a bit battered now, but really worth the money spent on it (£8 +p&p).

Traced the design on to the transfer mesh and then used a chacopel pencil to transfer on to fabric

Traced the design on to the transfer mesh and then used a chacopel pencil to transfer on to fabric (5 April 2010)

Here you can see the chacopel marks transferred on to the fabric

Here you can see the chacopel marks transferred on to the fabric

In this close up you can see the dotted chacopel marks from using the transfer mesh

In this close up you can see the dotted chacopel marks from using the transfer mesh

Once I had most of the vine border done, I started on the very bottom border lines. I realise now that these may have had cording in them rather than being quilted. This would have helped to give a nice round shape and would have reinforced against wear.

It was very important that these lines would be level and meet in the right place at the back so I had to be careful when drawing them out. The bottom edge of the fabric was no longer straight, so I could not use this as a guide. I used my patternmaster, the CF and quater lines, and the long mdf planks (I bought for basting) to work it all out and draw level lines.

Using the patternmaster and mdf planks to draw level guidelines

Using the patternmaster and mdf planks to draw level guidelines (12 April 2010)

Drawing on the 4 rows of bottom stitchingq

Drawing on the 4 rows of bottom stitching

I found as I was using the quilting frame, it was easier for me to use four needles and work all four rows in the frame area before moving on. In the image below you can see I have done the top three rows and am working on the fourth.

Using 4 needles to work the rows in the frame

Using 4 needles to work the rows in the frame

Class 24: Fitting Eva’s quilted petticoat, and quilting

Eva had finished quilting her petticoat, some by hand and some by machine, and it looks beautiful.

Claire had explained previously that once the quilting was finished, we should:

  • sew up the centre back seam leaving an opening at the top (so we can get in and out during fitting)
  • temporarily gather and tack the waist on to a petersham waistband for fitting

As Eva had done this too, I got to help fit the petticoat to check the hemline is even and at the correct length for the period silhouette. The quilted petticoat is fitted over the bum pads, under-petticoat and corset. Ideally, shoes with the correct heel height should also be worn during fitting.

Front of Eva's quilted petticoat during fitting

Front of Eva's quilted petticoat during fitting

Back of Eva's quilted petticoat during fitting

Back of Eva's quilted petticoat during fitting

Using a meter ruler, I checked the evenness of the hemline. Generally the hemline was good, a little lower at the back where the bum pads don’t push out so much, but this is common and looks ok.

However, we decided that the length was too short by about 8cm. Luckily, Eva had left a large seam allowance at the top, so there would be enough to let the petticoat out, but only just enough.

After the fitting, Eva will take petticoat of the waistband and pleat it on to another waistband, making the petticoat opening at the  sides rather than the back, so she can have accessible pockets under the petticoat.  She will also finish the hem using either bias binding or petersham.

I spent the rest of the class quilting – there is still so much to do. Started on the bottom border, but you can see between the first and second photo below, I didn’t really manage to get much done in class.

Starting the bottom border of the quilted petticoat
Starting the bottom border on the front left of the quilted petticoat
Bottom border of quilted petticoat

Bottom border of quilted petticoat

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